Category Archives: Uncategorized

Hope or Trust (Faith)

Scientist Dr Lauren Oakes poses this question to her peers:
“When you think about the future in terms of environmental change, how would you distinguish hope from faith? Do you experience either or both when thinking about the future (of planet, humanity, or self)?” From: In Search of the Canary Tree, The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World

As I explored my response to her question, I didn’t resonate well with faith, but when I swap “trust” for “faith”, I realise that it is something that I frequently change in my writing – I start by saying “I hope …” and then I change it to “I trust …” in an attempt to be more positive than tentative.

What differences do you find in the three words – hope, faith and trust?

Laughter or Ridicule? What are we listening for?

Saddened to hear of the violent death of Eurydice Dixon’s and tears welled up at Lisa Wilkinson’s (the Project) quote from Margaret Attwood:

‘Men are afraid women will laugh at them, women are afraid that men will kill them.’

How can we minimise ‘honour’ cultures where Aussie laughter is heard as ridicule and instead encourage a culture where we are all able to laugh at ourselves.

We are all made of carbon – let’s do this together

Fabulous phrase from Paul Hawken – “carbon is the element that holds hands and collaborates”.  Listen to Hawken as he launches the new playbook, Drawdown. Drawdown shows us, in a very visual and practical way, the actions we can each take to reduce future climate warming. It also “does the math” and shows what we should be supporting in our communities and countries, in order to ensure a future for our youth on this planet.

And who would have known that one of the top solutions is educating girls worldwide?

And another surprise is LEDs. IN fact, LED’s as a service would make a fantastic and profitable social enterprise.

Get your copy on April 18th, then get together, hold hands and get into action.

Will you stay or will you leave?

Fascinating article from researcher  Irit Alony, of Wollongong University, published in the Conversation today. She and her colleagues applied the successful divorce-prediction criteria of John Gottman, from the University of Washington, to see if it could predict which employees were more likely to leave their organisations.

If I understand the research study correctly, those who express negativity such as: “disappointment, withdrawal, hostility, or contempt” (Alony, Hasan & Sense, 2015) are more likely to leave both a marriage and a workplace.  In contrast, those of us who learn the following coping mechanisms are more likely to stay (in both a marriage and a workplace):
– Balancing the good with the bad (e.g. with at least a 2:1 ratio of two positive comments for every negative, aiming towards a thriving relationship ratio of 5:1)
– Genuinely accepting that bad things (e.g. annoying people and systems and rules) are just part of work life
– Avoiding lengthy discussions of the negatives (e.g. learning to shift conversations to focus on how they coped or what they learned so that we/they can do better or differently next time)
– Expressing hope (e.g. that you can directly influence and/or you can cope with whatever happens to you).

And the best way to increase the positives, is to thank others for their contribution, rather than just assuming “that’s what they are paid to do”.

So ‘thank you’ to my Thought Ratio colleague, MIchelle Carlyle for this link.

On not writing – perfectly

This describes it perfectly doesn’t it:

Perfectionism is really dangerous because if your fidelity to perfection is too high you never do anything because doing anything results in a … tragedy …because you sacrifice how gorgeous and perfect it is in your head for what it really is”.
David Foster Wallace

Lots of really interesting short videos at PBS Digital, especially if you are looking to distract yourself from writing anything that is less than perfect ha ha!

Watch the rest of the PBS Digital video here and then check out Philip Seymour Hoffman on happiness vs pleasure if you are a serious procrastinator.

Changing the conversation

I am exploring the current state of play of performance management “systems” with a great group of people, courtesy of Marie O’Brien and her Collaborative Learning Community.

In the meantime, I really like the Solution focused (or progress focused) approach and am keen to read Paul Z Jackson and Janine Waldman’s new book Positively Speaking.  Even if we cannot change the system all at once we can start the shift through changing the conversation from judgment to recognition of potential strengths and support for progress.